1887

Abstract

Group B (GBS; ) is the most common cause of neonatal meningitis and a rising cause of sepsis in adults. Recently, it has also been shown to cause foodborne disease. As with many other bacteria, the polysaccharide capsule of GBS is antigenic, enabling its use for strain serotyping. Recent advances in DNA sequencing have made sequence-based typing attractive (as has been implemented for several other bacteria, including , species complex, , and others). For GBS, existing WGS-based serotyping systems do not provide complete coverage of all known GBS serotypes (specifically including subtypes of serotype III), and none are simultaneously compatible with the two most common data types, raw short reads and assembled sequences. Here, we create a serotyping database (GBS-SBG, GBS Serotyping by Genome Sequencing), with associated scripts and running instructions, that can be used to call all currently described GBS serotypes, including subtypes of serotype III, using both direct short-read- and assembly-based typing. We achieved higher concordance using GBS-SBG on a previously reported data set of 790 strains. We further validated GBS-SBG on a new set of 572 strains, achieving 99.8% concordance with PCR-based molecular serotyping using either short-read- or assembly-based typing. The GBS-SBG package is publicly available and will hopefully accelerate and simplify serotyping by sequencing for GBS.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Genome Institute of Singapore
    • Principle Award Recipient: L ChenSwaine
  • Singapore Millennium Foundation
    • Principle Award Recipient: M.S. BarkhamTimothy
  • National Medical Research Council (Award CIRG19NOV-0024)
    • Principle Award Recipient: L ChenSwaine
  • National Medical Research Council (Award NMRC/CIRG/1467/2017)
    • Principle Award Recipient: L ChenSwaine
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2021-12-13
2022-01-29
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