1887

Abstract

is a typical example of an environmental originated opportunistic human pathogen, which can thrive at different habitats including the human body and can cause a wide range of infections. It must cope with heat stress during transition from the environment to the human body as the physiological temperature of the human body (37 °C) is higher than environmental niches (22–30 °C). Interestingly, a phylogenetic neighbour of within genus is unable to grow at 37 °C. Thus, it is crucial to understand how is adapted to human body temperature, which could suggest its evolution as an opportunistic human pathogen. In this study, we have performed comparative transcriptome analysis of grown at 28 and 37 °C as temperature representative for environmental niches and the human body, respectively. RNA-Seq analysis revealed several interesting findings showing alterations in gene-expression levels at 28 and 37 °C, which can play an important role during infection. We have observed downregulation of genes involved in cellular motility, energy production and metabolism, replication and repair whereas upregulation of VirB/D4 type IV secretion system, aerotaxis, cation diffusion facilitator family transporter and LacI family transcriptional regulators at 37 °C. Microscopy and plate assays corroborated altered expression of genes involved in motility. The results obtained enhance our understanding of the strategies employed by during adaptation towards the human body.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • CSIR-IMTECH (Award MLP-016)
    • Principle Award Recipient: PrabhuB. Patil
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2021-07-12
2021-08-04
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