1887

Abstract

is a highly diverse genus that includes species that cause disease in both plants and animals. Recently, pathogenic pseudomonads from the and species complexes have caused significant outbreaks in several agronomically important crops in Turkey, including tomato, citrus, artichoke and melon. We characterized 169 pathogenic strains associated with recent outbreaks in Turkey via multilocus sequence analysis and whole-genome sequencing, then used comparative and evolutionary genomics to characterize putative virulence mechanisms. Most of the isolates are closely related to other plant pathogens distributed among the primary phylogroups of , although there are significant numbers of isolates, which is a species better known as a rhizosphere-inhabiting plant-growth promoter. We found that all 39 citrus blast pathogens cluster in phylogroup 2, although strains isolated from the same host do not cluster monophyletically, with lemon, mandarin orange and sweet orange isolates all being intermixed throughout the phylogroup. In contrast, 20 tomato pith pathogens are found in two independent lineages: one in the secondary phylogroups, and the other from the species complex. These divergent pith necrosis strains lack characteristic virulence factors like the canonical tripartite type III secretion system, large effector repertoires and the ability to synthesize multiple bacterial phytotoxins, suggesting they have alternative molecular mechanisms to cause disease. These findings highlight the complex nature of host specificity among plant pathogenic pseudomonads.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Erciyes Üniversitesi (Award FIR-2018-7671)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SumerHoruz
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (Award RGPIN-2020-05124)
    • Principle Award Recipient: DavidS. Guttman
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2021-07-06
2021-08-02
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