1887

Abstract

Endolithic microbial symbionts in the coral skeleton may play a pivotal role in maintaining coral health. However, compared to aerobic micro-organisms, research on the roles of endolithic anaerobic micro-organisms and microbe–microbe interactions in the coral skeleton are still in their infancy. In our previous study, we showed that a group of coral-associated (CAP), a genus of anaerobic green sulphur bacteria, was dominant in the skeleton of the coral . Though CAP is diverse, the 16S rRNA phylogeny presents it as a distinct clade separate from other free-living . In this study, we build on previous research and further characterize the genomic and metabolic traits of CAP by recovering two new high-quality CAP genomes – Prosthecochloris isoporae and Prosthecochloris sp. N1 – from the coral endolithic cultures. Genomic analysis revealed that these two CAP genomes have high genomic similarities compared with other and harbour several CAP-unique genes. Interestingly, different CAP species harbour various pigment synthesis and sulphur metabolism genes, indicating that individual CAPs can adapt to a diversity of coral microenvironments. A novel high-quality genome of sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB)– Halodesulfovibrio lyudaonia – was also recovered from the same culture. The fact that CAP and various SRB co-exist in coral endolithic cultures and coral skeleton highlights the importance of SRB in the coral endolithic community. Based on functional genomic analysis of . P. sp. N1, . P. isoporae and . H. lyudaonia, we also propose a syntrophic relationship between the SRB and CAP in the coral skeleton.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (Award 105-2621-B-001-004-MY3)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Sen-LinTang
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2021-05-05
2022-01-18
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