1887

Abstract

The essential genome of a bacterium encompasses core genes associated with basic cellular processes and conditionally essential genes dependent upon environmental conditions or the genetic context. Comprehensive knowledge of those gene sets allows for a better understanding of fundamental bacterial biology and offers new perspectives for antimicrobial drug research against detrimental bacteria such as pathogens. We investigated the essential genome of pv. , a gammaproteobacterial plant pathogen of lettuce ( L.) which belongs to the plant-pathogen reservoir genus and is affiliated to the family . No practical means of disease control or prevention against this pathogen is currently available, and its molecular biology is virtually unknown. To reach a comprehensive overview of the essential genome of pv. LM16734, we developed a mixed approach combining high-quality full genome sequencing, saturated transposon insertion sequencing (Tn-Seq) in optimal growth conditions, and coupled computational analyses such as comparative genomics, synteny assessment and phylogenomics. Among the 370 essential loci identified by Tn-Seq, a majority was bound to critical cell processes conserved across bacteria. The remaining genes were either related to specific ecological features of or species, or acquired through horizontal gene transfer of mobile genetic elements and associated with ancestral parasitic gene behaviour and bacterial defence systems. Our study sheds new light on our usual concepts about gene essentiality and is pioneering in the molecular and genomic study of pv. .

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Fonds européen agricole pour le développement rural (FEADER)
    • Principle Award Recipient: FranckBertolla
  • Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l'Innovation
    • Principle Award Recipient: LucasMorinière
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License.
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2021-03-24
2021-10-28
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