1887

Abstract

Research into the lower urinary tract (LUT) microbiota has primarily focused on its relationship to LUT symptoms (LUTS), taking snapshots of these communities in individuals with and without LUTS. While certain bacterial taxa have been associated with LUTS, or the lack thereof, the temporal dynamics of this community were largely unknown. Recently, we conducted a longitudinal study and found that vaginal intercourse resulted in a shift in species richness and diversity within the LUT microbiota. This is particularly relevant as frequent vaginal intercourse is a major risk factor for urinary tract infection (UTI) in premenopausal women (Aydin 2015;26:795–804). To further investigate the relationship between vaginal intercourse and LUT microbiota, here we present the results of a 3 week study in which daily urogenital specimens were collected from a female participant and her male sexual partner. Consistent with our previous findings, the LUT microbiota changed after vaginal intercourse, most notably a high abundance of was observed post-coitus. We isolated and sequenced from both sexual partners finding that: (i) the isolates from the female partner’s urogenital tract were genomically similar throughout the duration of the study, and (ii) they were related to one isolate from the male partner’s oral cavity collected at the end of the study, suggesting transmission between the two individuals. We hypothesize that blooms in after vaginal intercourse may play a role in coitus-related UTI. We found that a isolate, in contrast to a isolate displaced after vaginal intercourse, cannot inhibit the growth of uropathogenic . Thus, this bloom in may provide a window of opportunity for a uropathogen to colonize the LUT.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License.
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2021-02-25
2021-10-28
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