1887

Abstract

is one of the main microbial species colonizing the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and is responsible for the decline in respiratory function. Despite the hostile pulmonary environment, is able to establish chronic infections thanks to its strong adaptive capacity. Various longitudinal studies have attempted to compare the strains of early infection with the adapted strains of chronic infection. Thanks to new ‘-omics’ techniques, convergent genetic mutations, as well as transcriptomic and proteomic dysregulations have been identified. As a consequence of this evolution, the adapted strains of have particular phenotypes that promote persistent infection.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Association Gregory Lemarchal
    • Principle Award Recipient: KarenMoreau
  • Association Vaincre la Mucoviscidose
    • Principle Award Recipient: KarenMoreau
  • Fondation Innovations en Infectiologie
    • Principle Award Recipient: KarenMoreau
  • FRM (Award ECO20170637499)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LauraCamus
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2021-02-02
2021-10-18
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