1887

Abstract

Penicillin-non-susceptible (PNSP) were first detected in the 1960s, and are now common worldwide, predominantly through the international spread of a limited number of strains. Extant PNSP are characterized by mosaic , and genes generated by interspecies recombinations, with the extent of these alterations determining the range and concentrations of β-lactams to which the genotype is non-susceptible. The complexity of the genetics underlying these phenotypes has been the subject of both molecular microbiology and genome-wide association and epistasis analyses. Such studies can aid our understanding of PNSP evolution and help improve the already highly-performing bioinformatic methods capable of identifying PNSP from genomic surveillance data.

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2019-10-01
2021-10-28
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