1887

Abstract

Species of the genus are emerging healthcare-associated pathogens, often colonizing the hospital environment. There are no clear guidelines available for antimicrobial susceptibility of this organism. In this report we present the first case, to our knowledge, of simultaneous central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to from India.

A 62 years old man with a history of a road traffic accident 1 month previously was referred to our center for further management. He developed features of sepsis and aspiration pneumonia on day 3 of admission. Four blood cultures (two each from central and peripheral lines) and two tracheal aspirate cultures grew pure yellow colonies of bacteria. Both matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, (MALDI-TOF MS; bioMérieux, Marcy-L'Etoile, France,) and BD Phoenix (BD Biosciences, Maryland, USA) identified the organism as . However, BD Phoenix failed to provide MIC breakpoints. The isolates of both from blood and tracheal aspirate showed identical susceptibility patterns: resistant to cephalosporins and carbapenems and susceptible to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, amikacin, trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole, piperacillin–tazobactam, cefoperazone–sulbactam, doxycycline, minocycline and vancomycin. Following levofloxacin therapy, the fever responded within 48 h and procalcitonin levels decreased without removal of the central line or endotracheal tube. However, the patient developed sudden cardiac arrest on day 10 of treatment and could not be resuscitated.

Rapid and accurate identification of in the laboratory, preferably based on MALDI-TOF, is essential for guiding therapy. responds well to fluoroquinolones without the need to remove indwelling catheters.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmmcr/10.1099/jmmcr.0.005122
2017-10-16
2020-01-29
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmmcr/4/10/jmmcr005122.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmmcr/10.1099/jmmcr.0.005122&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Chiu CW, Li MC, Ko WC, Li CW, Chen PL et al. Clinical impact of Gram-negative nonfermenters on adults with community-onset bacteremia in the emergency department. J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2015;48:92–100 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Black JA, Moland ES, Thomson KS. AmpC disk test for detection of plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae lacking chromosomal AmpC β-lactamases. J Clin Microbiol 2005;43:3110–3113 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Holmes B, Owen RJ, Steigerwalt AG, Brenner DJ. Flavobacterium gleum, a new species found in human clinical specimens. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1984;34:21–25 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Vandamme P, Bernardet JF, Segers P, Kersters K, Holmes B. New perspectives in the classification of the flavobacteria: description of Chryseobacterium gen. nov., Bergeyella gen. nov., and Empedobacter nom. rev. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1994;44:827–831 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Chen FL, Wang GC, Teng SO, Ou TY, Yu FL et al. Clinical and epidemiological features of Chryseobacterium indologenes infections: analysis of 215 cases. J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2013;46:425–432 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Rajendran P, Muthusamy S, Balaji VK, Rakesh GJ, Easow JM. Urinary tract infection due to Chryseobacterium gleum, an uncommon pathogen. Indian J Pathol Microbiol 2016;59:551–553 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Rawat A, Vignesh P, Sharma A, Shandilya JK, Sharma M et al. Infection profile in chronic granulomatous disease: a 23-year experience from a tertiary care center in North India. J Clin Immunol 2017;37:319–328 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Garg S, Appannanavar SB, Mohan B, Taneja N. Pyonephrosis due to Chryseobacterium gleum: a first case report. Indian J Med Microbiol 2015;33:311–313 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. CLSI Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, 26th ed. CLSI Supplement M100S Wayne, PA: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2016
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Kirby JT, Sader HS, Walsh TR, Jones RN. Antimicrobial susceptibility and epidemiology of a worldwide collection of Chryseobacterium spp: report from the SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program (1997–2001). J Clin Microbiol 2004;42:445–448 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Lo HH, Chang SM. Identification, characterization, and biofilm formation of clinical Chryseobacterium gleum isolates. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 2014;79:298–302 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Abdulwahab A, Taj-Aldeen SJ, Ibrahim EB, Talaq E, Abu-Madi M et al. Discrepancy in MALDI-TOF MS identification of uncommon Gram-negative bacteria from lower respiratory secretions in patients with cystic fibrosis. Infect Drug Resist 2015;8:83–88 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Virok DP, Ábrók M, Szél B, Tajti Z, Mader K et al. Chryseobacterium gleum – a novel bacterium species detected in neonatal respiratory tract infections. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2014;27:1926–1929 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Brkić DV, Zlopaša O, Bedenić B, Plečko V. Chryseobacterium gleum infection in patient with extreme malnutrition and hepatic lesion – case report. Signa Vitae 2015;10:50–52 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Ramya TG, Baby S, Das P, Gaatha RK. Chryseobacterium gleum urinary tract infection. Genes Rev 2015;1:1–5[Crossref]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Abdalhamid B, Elhadi N, Alsamman K, Aljindan R. Chryseobacterium gleum pneumonia in an infant with nephrotic syndrome. IDCases 2016;5:34–36 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Lambiase A, del Pezzo M, Raia V, Sepe A, Ferri P et al. Chryseobacterium respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. J Infect 2007;55:518–523 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Hsueh PR, Hsiue TR, Wu JJ, Teng LJ, Ho SW et al. Flavobacterium indologenes bacteremia: clinical and microbiological characteristics. Clin Infect Dis 1996;23:550–555 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Hsueh PR, Teng LJ, Ho SW, Hsieh WC, Luh KT. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of Flavobacterium indologenes infections associated with indwelling devices. J Clin Microbiol 1996;34:1908–1913[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmmcr/10.1099/jmmcr.0.005122
Loading
/content/journal/jmmcr/10.1099/jmmcr.0.005122
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited articles

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error