1887

Abstract

Introduction:

is a Gram‐positive facultative anaerobic coccoid rod bacterium that grows slowly in culture. This bacterium was classified as a new genus in 1997 but is often overlooked or considered a contaminant because of both its resemblance to the normal bacterial flora on skin and mucosa and the overgrowth of other bacteria. During the past decade, has emerged as a more common urinary tract pathogen than previously thought.

Case presentation:

Here, we describe the case of a patient with an untreated urinary tract infection that turned into urosepsis.

Conclusion:

This case shows that the invasive potential of this bacterium should not always be ruled out.

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2015-04-01
2019-12-05
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