1887

Abstract

The prevalence of IgG antibodies against recombinant culture filtrate protein-10 (rCFP-10) was investigated in serum samples from 56 leprosy patients, 15 tuberculosis (TB) patients, 14 other skin-diseased patients and 20 healthy subjects. On classifying the patients into bacterial index (BI)-positive and BI-negative groups, the assay showed 83.3 % (15/18) sensitivity for detection of BI-positive leprosy patients. On the other hand, the sensitivity for detection of BI-negative patients was 18.4 % (7/38). None of the 15 TB patients and 14 other skin-diseased patients was positive; however, only one out of 20 healthy individuals was positive, indicating that antibody response to culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) was highly specific (98.0 %; 48/49). Statistically, the performance of the CFP-10-based assay was found to be comparable (>0.05) with that of an anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) antibody-detecting assay. Thus, CFP-10 is potentially a specific antigen for measuring antibody response in BI-positive leprosy patients. Being a secreted antigen, CFP-10 may act as a marker for the viability of inside the host, and hence its serological potential is worth exploring for application in monitoring the response of patients with BI-positive leprosy (a highly infectious form) during the course of chemotherapy. When comparing the bacteriological and serological results, an agreement of 82.1 % showed that seropositivity to CFP-10 corresponded well with bacteriological criteria. Hence, CFP-10 seems to be a suitable antigen for classification of leprosy patients into BI-positive and BI-negative groups.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.46587-0
2006-10-01
2019-11-19
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/55/10/1337.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.46587-0&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Berthet, F. X., Rasmussen, P. B., Rosenkrands, I., Andersen, P. & Gicquel, B. ( 1998; ). A Mycobacterium tuberculosis operon encoding CFP-10 and a novel low-molecular-mass culture filtrate protein (CFP-10). Microbiology 144, 3195–3203.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Cole, S. T, Brosch, R., Parkhill, J. & 39 other authors ( 1998; ). Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence. Nature 393, 537–544.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Cole, S. T., Eiglmeier, K., Parkhill, J. & 41 other authors ( 2001; ). Massive gene decay in the leprosy bacillus. Nature 409, 1007–1011.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Douglas, J. T., Hirsch, D. S., Fajardo, T. T., Cellona, R. V., Abalos, R. M., de la Cruz, E. C., Madarang, M. G., de Wit, M. Y. & Klatser, P. R. ( 1989; ). Evaluation of Mycobacterium leprae antigens in the serological monitoring of a clofazimine-based chemotherapeutic study of dapsone resistant lepromatous leprosy patients in Cebu, Phillipines. Lepr Rev 60, 8–19.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Gelber, R. H., Li, F., Cho, S. N., Byrd, S., Rajagopalan, K. & Brennan, P. J. ( 1989; ). Serum antibodies to defined carbohydrate antigens during the course of treated leprosy. Int J Lep 57, 744–751.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Geluk, A., van Meijgaarden, K. E., Franken, K. L. M. C., Wieles, B., Arend, S. M., Faber, W. R. B., Naafsy, B. & Ottenhoff, T. H. M. ( 2004; ). Immunological crossreactivity of the Mycobacterium leprae CFP-10 with its homologue in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Scand J Immunol 59, 66–70.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Hunter, S. W. & Brennan, P. J. ( 1981; ). A novel phenolic glycolipid from M. leprae possibly involved in immunogenenicity and pathogenicity. J Bacteriol 147, 728–735.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Hunter, S. W., Rivoire, B., Mehra, V., Bloom, B. R. & Brennan, P. J. ( 1990; ). The major native proteins of the leprosy bacillus. J Biol Chem 265, 14065–14068.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Klatser, P. R., de Wit, M. Y, Fajardo, T. T., Cellona, R. V., Abalos, R. M., de la Cruz, E. C., Madarang, M. G., Hirsch, D. S. & Douglas, J. T. ( 1989; ). Evaluation of Mycobacterium leprae antigens in the monitorng of dapsone-based chemotherapy of previously untreated lepromatous patients in Cebu, Phillipines. Lepr Rev 60, 178–186.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Meeker, H. C., Schuller-Levis, G., Fusco, F., Giardina-Becket, M., Sersen, E. & Levis, W. R. ( 1990; ). Sequential monitoring of leprosy patients with serum antibody levels to phenolic glycolipid-1, a synthetic analog of phenolic glycolipid-1, and mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan. Int J Lep 58, 503–511.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Oskam, L., Slim, E. & Buhrer-Sekula, S. ( 2003; ). Serology in leprosy research and control: recent developments, strengths, limitations and prospects: a state of the art overview. Lepr Rev 74, 196–205.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Parkash, O. ( 2002; ). Progress towards detection of Mycobacterium leprae infection, employing 35kDa antigen: an update. Lepr Rev 72, 9–19.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Patil, S. A., Sinha, S. & Sengupta, U. ( 1986; ). Detection of mycobacterial antigens in leprosy serum immune complex. J Clin Microbiol 24, 169–171.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Ramanathan, V. D., Parkash, O., Ramu, G., Parker, D., Curtis, J., Sengupta, U. & Turk, J. L. ( 1984; ). Isolation and analysis of circulating immune complexes in leprosy. Clin Immunol Immunopathol 32, 261–268.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Reece, S. T., Ireton, G., Mohamath, R. & 7 other authors ( 2006; ). ML0405 and ML2331 are antigens of Mycobacterium leprae with potential for diagnosis of leprosy. Clin Vaccine Immunol 13, 333–340.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Spencer, J. S., Kim, H. J., Marques, A. M. & 8 other authors ( 2004; ). Comparative analysis of B- and T-cell epitopes of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate protein 10. Infect Immun 72, 3161–3170.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Thole, J. E. R., Wieles, B. J. E., Clark-Curtiss, J. E., Ottenhoff, T. H. M. & Rinke de Wit, T. F. ( 1995; ). Immunological and functional characterization of Mycobacterium leprae proteins: an overview. Mol Microbiol 18, 791–800.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Triccas, J. A., Winter, N., Roche, P. W., Gilpin, A., Kendrick, K. E. & Britton, W. J. ( 1998; ). Molecular and immunological analysis of the Mycobacterium avium homolog of the immunodominant Mycobacterium leprae 35-kilodalton protein. Infect Immun 66, 2684–2690.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. World Health Organization ( 1998; ). WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy. World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser 874, 1–43.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. World Health Organization ( 2005; ). Global Strategy for Further Reducing the Leprosy Burden and Sustaining Leprosy Control Activities (Plan Period: 2006–2010), report no. WHO/CDS/CPE/CEE/2005.53. Geneva: World Health Organization.
  21. Young, D. B. S. H., Kaufmann, S. H., Hermans, P. W. & Thole, J. E. ( 1992; ). Mycobacterial protein antigens: a compilation. Mol Microbiol 6, 133–145.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.46587-0
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.46587-0
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error