1887

Abstract

The IS repetitive element is present in multiple copies in most complex bacteria, except for strains, which usually contain a single copy of IS located on a 1·9 kb II fragment of the direct repeat region. IS transposition can disrupt coding regions and is a major force of genomic variation. In a previous work it was demonstrated that phospholipase C genes are preferential loci for IS transposition in clinical strains. Bacterial phospholipase C enzymes participate in pathogenic mechanisms used by different organisms, and have been implicated in intracellular survival, cytolysis and cell-to-cell spread. Four phospholipase C genes (, , and ) were detected in the genomes of , , and ‘’. and the vaccine strain Bacillus Calmette–Guérin contain only the gene. In the present work, the existence of IS insertions within , the unique phospholipase C gene of , has been investigated by PCR, Southern blot hybridization and sequencing analysis. In 18 (7·3 %) of 245 isolates analysed, the gene was interrupted by the insertion of one copy of IS, which in all cases was transposed in the same orientation and at the same position, 1 972 894, relative to the genome of AF2122/97. These 18 isolates were distributed in 6 different spoligotype patterns and contained 4 to 8 IS copies. In contrast, strains showing an intact gene contained one (87 %), two (9·4 %) or three (2·4 %) IS copies, and only a single isolate (1·2 %) had four IS copies. The implications of gene disruption in have not been fully investigated, but no differences in the organ distribution of the disease were detected when animals infected with strains from the same spoligotype patterns bearing  : : IS and intact were compared.

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2006-04-01
2019-11-17
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