1887

Abstract

This report describes the investigation of the genetic profiles of 53 isolates collected from 18 hospitals in Taiwan using three PFGE-based typing methods (PFGE karyotyping, and PFGE of I and HII restriction fragments) and one repetitive-sequence-PCR (rep-PCR) method. All four methods were able to identify clonal related isolates from the same patients. PFGE-HII exhibited the highest discriminatory power by discriminating 40 genotypes, followed by PFGE-I (35 genotypes) and then by rep-PCR (31 genotypes), while PFGE karyotyping exhibited the lowest discriminatory power (19 genotypes). High discriminatory power can also be achieved by combining typing methods with different typing mechanisms, such as rep-PCR and PFGE-based typing methods. The results also showed that the genotype of each isolate was patient-specific and not associated with the source of the isolation, geographic origin or antifungal resistance.

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2005-03-01
2019-11-22
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