1887

Abstract

Molecular typing of isolates from animals and humans may be useful for evaluation of the possibility for interspecies transmission. The objective of this study was to evaluate isolates from domestic animals and humans using PCR ribotyping. Isolates were also tested using PCR for the presence of genes encoding toxins A and B. One hundred and thirty-three isolates of from dogs ( = 92), horses ( = 21) and humans ( = 20), plus one each from a cat and a calf, were evaluated. Overall, 23 ribotypes were identified. Of these, nine were identified from dogs, 12 from horses, seven from humans and one each from the cat and calf. In dogs, humans and horses, one or two different ribotypes predominated. Overall, 25 % of isolates from humans were indistinguishable from isolates from one or more animal species. Genes encoding toxins A and B were detected in all human, equine and bovine isolates, and in 69 % of canine isolates. While different ribotypes appear to predominate in different mammalian species, several indistinguishable strains may be found in multiple species. This suggests that there is a potential for interspecies transmission of and epidemiological studies are warranted.

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2005-02-01
2019-11-20
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