1887

Abstract

The extracellular phospholipases of are considered to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of human infections. Therefore 30 clinical isolates of from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals were screened for phospholipase production (using an egg-yolk-agar medium). Two groups of six isolates with positive (group A) or deficient (group B) phospholipase activity were then analysed for phospholipase B1 () gene expression both in egg-yolk-agar and yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) broth media. A total of four virulence attributes of these two groups were in turn characterized, namely their germ-tube formation, cell-surface-hydrophobicity (CSH), adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (ABEC) and haemolysin production, and these factors were subsequently correlated with expression. In the phospholipase-producing isolates (group A) a positive correlation was demonstrated between phospholipase production and the degree of expression in YPD medium ( = 0.96, < 0.01). No such association was observed in group A isolates for expression in egg-yolk-agar medium. Further, expression in egg-yolk agar was less than that in YPD medium, although a positive correlation was seen between the expression levels on regression analysis ( = 0.86, = 0.026). Surprisingly, however, no significant associations were observed in either growth media between expression and any of the four pathogenic attributes examined ( < 0.001). A significant correlation was seen between CSH and ABEC ( = 0.74) in group A isolates. The phospholipase-deficient group B, however, demonstrated a significant correlation between the latter parameters (r=+0^h.50) and also between germ-tube formation and ABEC (r=−0^h.59), and germ-tube formation and haemolysin production (r=+0^h.31). It appears that in oral isolates in HIV infection there may be no significant association between the degree of expression and other widely recognized major virulence attributes.

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2005-06-01
2019-11-18
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