1887

Abstract

is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that is an important cause of human food-borne illness worldwide. However, strains demonstrate considerable variation in pathogenic potential. In this report, virulent and avirulent isolates were compared by using a comparative screening strategy. Two clones were identified that contained DNA that was only present in virulent strains. PCR primers were designed for three genes from these clones and for five other selected genes. All eight primer sets predominantly detected virulent isolates, as determined by a mouse virulence assay; one of the putative internalin genes, , was detected in all strains that were considered to be virulent. Primers from these eight genes were then tested by PCR against a larger panel of bacterial strains; each of the genes was detected predominantly in clinical or food isolates, rather than environmental isolates. The findings from this study suggest that virulent strains may possess genes that are not present in avirulent isolates, which could serve as markers for PCR assessment of virulence.

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2003-12-01
2019-11-12
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