1887

Abstract

In order to improve our understanding of the colonization of the pulmonary tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by , 162 isolates from five different ecological origins were studied. The genetic features of each isolate were determined by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and by searching for eight virulence genes (six known virulence genes, , , , , and , and two genes encoding putative neuraminidases, and ). Five RAPD groups were identified. Most of the CF isolates were distributed equally in three of these groups (RA, RB and RC). The CF isolates in RB were related to isolates from a wide variety of origins. The CF isolates in RA were related to a population composed of 65 % of the non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. RC was mainly composed of CF isolates that were related to 30 % of isolates from plants. All genes except and were present in all isolates. The and virulence factor genes were most prevalent in CF isolates. , which encodes exoenzyme S, was present in 94 % of CF isolates but also in 80 % of non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. , which encodes a putative neuraminidase, was found in 82.5 % of the isolates from group RC, which was composed largely of CF isolates. In conclusion, three major genogroups of isolates, each of which exhibits peculiar genetic features, are able to colonize CF patients. This may have different consequences on the outcome of pulmonary disease.

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2004-01-01
2019-11-16
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