1887

Abstract

is an environmental organism encountered in natural and urban water sources as well as soil. biofilm has recently been identified on sauna walls and in city water pipes and might have a role in the survival of virulent strains in the environment and in the host. To characterize the biofilm, an model was adapted wherein biofilm develops on a PVC surface. Biofilm was detected by staining with crystal violet and visualization by optical microscopy and quantified by . strains MAC 101, MAC 100, MAC 104, MAC 109, MAC A5 and MAC 5501 (all isolated from the blood of AIDS patients) were used in the assays. Biofilm formation was dependent on the presence of Ca, Mg or Zn ions in the water, with the maximal effect seen at a concentration of 1 μM. The presence of 2 % glucose and peptone as sources of carbon increased the formation of biofilm, while this was partially inhibited by humic acid. Since sliding motility has been associated with the amount of glycopeptidolipid (GPL), TLC was used to determine the presence of GPL. The supernatant of a biofilm-forming culture induced formation of a stable biofilm and amikacin blocked the establishment of biofilm by strains at subinhibitory concentrations. Bacteria in the biofilm were more resistant to chlorine as well as to exposure to potassium monopersulfate and chloroheximide acetate than were planktonic bacteria. Identification of genes involved in biofilm formation and further studies of the effect of antimicrobials on the establishment of biofilm may identify approaches for inhibiting biofilm formation and colonization.

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2003-09-01
2019-11-15
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