1887

Abstract

This study forms part of the development of an integrated genotyping system for (group B streptococcus, GBS) that can be used to study the population genetics of the organism and the pathogenesis and epidemiology of GBS disease. In recent previous studies, two sets of markers, the capsular polysaccharide synthesis () gene cluster and surface protein antigen genes, have been used to assign molecular serotypes (MS) and protein-gene profiles (PGP) to more than 200 isolates. In the present study, five mobile genetic elements (MGE) have been used as a third set of markers, to characterize further 194 invasive isolates, recovered from blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Of these, 97 % contained one or more of the five MGE, the distribution of which was related to MS and PGP, as illustrated by MS III, which is divisible into four serosubtypes with different combinations of the MGE (or none). Fifty-six different genotypes and eight genetic clusters were identified, each with different combinations of the three sets of molecular markers. Five predominant genotypes (Ia-1, Ib-1, III-1, III-2 and V-1) contained 62 % of the isolates and five of the eight genetic clusters contained 92 % of the isolates. The 17 CSF isolates were relatively widely distributed between 10 genotypes and across seven of the eight clusters. Further study is needed to determine whether these genotypes or clusters share common markers of increased virulence. In future, comparison of invasive with colonizing strains of GBS may elucidate the significance of these findings.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.05067-0
2003-04-01
2019-11-12
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/52/4/337.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.05067-0&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Ahmet, Z., Stanier, P., Harvey, D. & Holt, D. ( 1999;). New PCR primers for the sensitive detection and specific identification of group B beta-hemolytic streptococci in cerebrospinal fluid. Mol Cell Probes 13, 349–357.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Chaffin, D. O., Beres, S. B., Yim, H. H. & Rubens, C. E. ( 2000;). The serotype of type Ia and III group B streptococci is determined by the polymerase gene within the polycistronic capsule operon. J Bacteriol 182, 4466–4477.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Chatellier, S., Huet, H., Kenzi, S., Rosenau, A., Geslin, P. & Quentin, R. ( 1996;). Genetic diversity of rRNA operons of unrelated Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of neonates suffering from meningitis. J Clin Microbiol 34, 2741–2747.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Enright, M. C. & Spratt, B. G. ( 1999;). Multilocus sequence typing. Trends Microbiol 7, 482–487.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Franken, C., Haase, G., Brandt, C., Weber-Heynemann, J., Martin, S., Lammler, C., Podbielski, A., Lutticken, R. & Spellerberg, B. ( 2001;). Horizontal gene transfer and host specificity of beta-haemolytic streptococci: the role of a putative composite transposon containing scpB and lmb. Mol Microbiol 41, 925–935.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Glaser, P., Rusniok, C., Buchrieser, C. & 9 other authors ( 2002;). Genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, a pathogen causing invasive neonatal disease. Mol Microbiol 45, 1499–1513.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Granlund, M., Oberg, L., Sellin, M. & Norgren, M. ( 1998;). Identification of a novel insertion element, IS1548, in group B streptococci, predominantly in strains causing endocarditis. J Infect Dis 177, 967–976.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Granlund, M., Michel, F. & Norgren, M. ( 2001;). Mutually exclusive distribution of IS1548 and GBSi1, an active group II intron identified in human isolates of group B streptococci. J Bacteriol 183, 2560–2569.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Hauge, M., Jespersgaard, C., Poulsen, K. & Kilian, M. ( 1996;). Population structure of Streptococcus agalactiae reveals an association between specific evolutionary lineages and putative virulence factors but not disease. Infect Immun 64, 919–925.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Jiang, S. M., Wang, L. & Reeves, P. R. ( 2001;). Molecular characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 4, 6B, 8, and 18C capsular polysaccharide gene clusters. Infect Immun 69, 1244–1255.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kong, F., Gowan, S., Martin, D., James, G. & Gilbert, G. L. ( 2002;a). Serotype identification of group B streptococci by PCR and sequencing. J Clin Microbiol 40, 216–226.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kong, F., Gowan, S., Martin, D., James, G. & Gilbert, G. L. ( 2002;b). Molecular profiles of group B streptococcal surface protein antigen genes: relationship to molecular serotypes. J Clin Microbiol 40, 620–626.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Lachenauer, C. S., Creti, R., Michel, J. L. & Madoff, L. C. ( 2000;). Mosaicism in the alpha-like protein genes of group B streptococci. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97, 9630–9635.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Limansky, A. S., Sutich, E. G., Guardati, M. C., Toresani, I. E. & Viale, A. M. (1998). Genomic diversity among Streptococcus agalactiae isolates detected by a degenerate oligonucleotide-primed amplification assay. J Infect Dis 177, 1308–1313.
  15. Mahillon, J. & Chandler, M. ( 1998;). Insertion sequences. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 62, 725–774.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Mahillon, J., Leonard, C. & Chandler, M. ( 1999;). IS elements as constituents of bacterial genomes. Res Microbiol 150, 675–687.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Martinez, G., Harel, J., Higgins, R., Lacouture, S., Daignault, D. & Gottschalk, M. ( 2000;). Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates of bovine and human origin by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. J Clin Microbiol 38, 71–78.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Martinez-Abarca, F. & Toro, N. ( 2000;). Group II introns in the bacterial world. Mol Microbiol 38, 917–926.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Mawn, J. A., Simpson, A. J. & Heard, S. R. ( 1993;). Detection of the C protein gene among group B streptococci using PCR. J Clin Pathol 46, 633–636.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Musser, J. M., Mattingly, S. J., Quentin, R., Goudeau, A. & Selander, R. K. ( 1989;). Identification of a high-virulence clone of type III Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) causing invasive neonatal disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86, 4731–4735.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Quentin, R., Huet, H., Wang, F. S., Geslin, P., Goudeau, A. & Selander, R. K. ( 1995;). Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae strains by multilocus enzyme genotype and serotype: identification of multiple virulent clone families that cause invasive neonatal disease. J Clin Microbiol 33, 2576–2581.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Rubens, C. E., Heggen, L. M. & Kuypers, J. M. ( 1989;). IS861, a group B streptococcal insertion sequence related to IS150 and IS3 of Escherichia coli. J Bacteriol 171, 5531–5535.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Schuchat, A. ( 1998;). Epidemiology of group B streptococcal disease in the United States: shifting paradigms. Clin Microbiol Rev 11, 497–513.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Sellin, M., Hakansson, S. & Norgren, M. ( 1995;). Phase-shift of polysaccharide capsule expression in group B streptococci, type III. Microb Pathog 18, 401–415.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Spellerberg, B., Martin, S., Franken, C., Berner, R. & Lutticken, R. ( 2000;). Identification of a novel insertion sequence element in Streptococcus agalactiae. Gene 241, 51–56.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Takahashi, S., Detrick, S., Whiting, A. A., Blaschke-Bonkowksy, A. J., Aoyagi, Y., Adderson, E. E. & Bohnsack, J. F. ( 2002;). Correlation of phylogenetic lineages of group B streptococci, identified by analysis of restriction-digestion patterns of genomic DNA, with infB alleles and mobile genetic elements. J Infect Dis 186, 1034–1038.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Tamura, G. S., Herndon, M., Przekwas, J., Rubens, C. E., Ferrieri, P. & Hillier, S. L. ( 2000;). Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the insertion sequence IS1381 in group B streptococci. J Infect Dis 181, 364–368.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Tettelin, H., Masignani, V., Cieslewicz, M. J. & 40 other authors ( 2002;). Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99, 12391–12396.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. van Belkum, A., Struelens, M., de Visser, A., Verbrugh, H. & Tibayrenc, M. ( 2001;). Role of genomic typing in taxonomy, evolutionary genetics, and microbial epidemiology. Clin Microbiol Rev 14, 547–560.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Wastfelt, M., Stalhammar-Carlemalm, M., Delisse, A. M., Cabezon, T. & Lindahl, G. ( 1996;). Identification of a family of streptococcal surface proteins with extremely repetitive structure. J Biol Chem 271, 18892–18897.[CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.05067-0
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.05067-0
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error