1887

Abstract

Although HIV-infected individuals harbour multiple strains of oral , little is known of their micro-evolution over time. Therefore, a prospective study was conducted with 16 HIV-infected ethnic Chinese individuals with and without symptoms of oropharyngeal candidiasis to evaluate the genotype distribution of oral isolates during HIV disease progression. Oral-rinse samples were obtained from all individuals and up to five colonies were selected for each visit, over a 12 month period of multiple visits. After identification of isolates using standard mycological criteria, the genetic similarities of yeast isolates within and between sequential clones of were assessed by DNA fingerprinting through random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The results of RAPD gel profiles and the lineage of each isolate were further analysed using commercially available software. RAPD studies revealed the prevalence of up to 14 different genotypes per individual during the study period, with multiple genotypes isolated simultaneously from a single oral rinse. Computer analysis of RAPD profiles revealed that yeasts isolated over sequential visits from symptomatic individuals demonstrated a striking level of relatedness compared with isolates from asymptomatic individuals. Genetically identical strains also formed ‘loosely’ connected subclusters that overlapped multiple visits, implying genetic ‘shuffling’ in these isolates during disease progression. These data point to varying evolutionary genetic trends in associated with symptomatic oral candidiasis and asymptomatic carriage in HIV disease.

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2003-04-01
2019-10-14
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