1887

Abstract

We report a case of fulminant endocarditis on a prosthetic homograft aortic valve caused by , which was successfully managed by surgical valve replacement and antibiotic treatment. , a strictly aerobic, small, Gram-negative coccobacillus, has been implicated as an infrequent cause of a pertussis-like syndrome and other respiratory illnesses. However, is also a rare cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis, mostly in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of endocarditis on a prosthetic aortic valve. Routine laboratory testing initially misidentified the strain as sp. Correct identification was achieved by 16S rRNA gene and outer-membrane protein A () gene sequencing. Interestingly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry also produced an accurate species-level identification. Subsequent susceptibility testing and review of the literature revealed ceftazidime, cefepime, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline and colistin as possible candidates to treat infections caused by .

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2012-06-01
2020-05-27
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