1887

Abstract

Maternal screening tests and prophylactic antibiotics are important to prevent neonatal and infant group B streptococcal (GBS) infections.

The performance of enrichment broth media for GBS screening that are available in Japan is unclear. Whole-genome data of GBS isolates from pregnant women in Japan is lacking.

The aim of this study was to compare the protocol performance of six enrichment broths and two subculture agar plates, which were all available in Japan, for GBS detection. In addition, we showed whole-genome data of GBS isolates from pregnant women in Japan.

We collected 133 vaginal-rectal swabs from pregnant women visiting clinics and hospitals in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan, and compared the protocol performance of 6 enrichment broths and 2 subculture agar plates. All GBS isolates collected in this study were subjected to whole-genome sequencing analysis.

We obtained 133 vaginal-rectal swabs from pregnant women at 35–37 weeks of gestation from 8 private clinics and 2 local municipal hospitals within Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. The detection rate of the protocol involving the six enrichment broths and subsequent subcultures varied between 95.5 and 100 %, depending on the specific choice of enrichment broth. The GBS carriage rate among pregnant women in this region was 18.8 %. All 25 isolates derived from the swabs were susceptible to penicillin, whereas 48 and 36 % of the isolates demonstrated resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin, respectively. The distribution of serotypes was highly diverse, encompassing seven distinct serotypes among the isolates, with the predominant serotype being serotype V ( = 8). Serotype V isolates displayed a tendency towards increased resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin, with all resistant isolates containing the gene.

There was no difference in performance among the culture protocols evaluated in this study. GBS strains isolated from pregnant women appeared to have greater genomic diversity than GBS strains detected in neonates/infants with invasive GBS infections. To confirm this result, further studies with larger sample sizes are needed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (Award JP23fk0108604)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MotoyukiSugai
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science London (Award 23K07957)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SatoshiNakano
  • Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (Award JP23fk0108665)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SatoshiNakano
  • Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (Award JP22fk0108540)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NakanoSatoshi
  • Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (Award JP22fk0108612)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SatoshiNakano
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2024-07-10
2024-07-15
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