1887

Abstract

Anti-fungal agents are increasingly becoming less effective due to the development of resistance. In addition, it is difficult to treat organisms that form biofilms due to a lack of ability of drugs to penetrate the biofilms. We are attempting to assess the effect of a new therapeutic agent, -acetylcysteine (NAC), on adhesion and biofilm formation in clinical strains. Meanwhile, to detect the transcription level changes of adhesion and biofilm formation-associated genes ( and ) when administrated with NAC in strains, furthermore, to explore the mechanism of drug interference on biofilms.

N-acetylcysteine (NAC) exhibits certain inhibitory effects on adhesion and biofilm formation in C. parapsilosis clinical strains from CRBSIs through: (1) down-regulating the expression of the CpEFG1 gene, making it a highly potential candidate for the treatment of C. parapsilosis catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), (2) regulating the metabolism and biofilm -forming factors of cell structure.

To determine whether non-antifungal agents can exhibit inhibitory effects on adhesion, amounts of total biofilm formation and metabolic activities of isolates from candidemia patients, NAC was added to the yeast suspensions at different concentrations, respectively. Reverse transcription was used to detect the transcriptional levels of adhesion-related genes ( and ) and biofilm formation-related factors ( and ) in the knockout strain, CP7 and CP5 clinical strains in the presence of NAC. To further explore the mechanism of NAC on the biofilms of , RNA sequencing was used to calculate gene expression, comparing the differences among samples. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis helps to illustrate the difference between two particular samples on functional levels.

A high concentration of NAC reduces the total amount of biofilm formation in . Following co-incubation with NAC, the expression of in both CP7 and CP5 clinical strains decreased, while there were no significant changes in the transcriptional levels of compared with the untreated strain. GO enrichment analysis showed that the metabolism and biofilm-forming factors of cell structure were all regulated after NAC intervention.

The non-antifungal agent NAC exhibits certain inhibitory effects on clinical isolate biofilm formation by down-regulating the expression of the gene, making it a highly potential candidate for the treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of the Central South University (Award NO.2042022kf1096)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ZuoXiaoshu
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2024-07-03
2024-07-17
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