1887

Abstract

The fungal pathogen can induce prolonged colonization of the lungs of susceptible patients, resulting in conditions such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis.

Analysis of the secretome released during sub-lethal infection of larvae may give an insight into products released during prolonged human colonisation.

larvae were infected with and the metabolism of host carbohydrate and proteins and production of fungal virulence factors were analysed. Label-free qualitative proteomic analysis was performed to identify fungal proteins in larvae at 96 hours post-infection and also to identify changes in the proteome as a result of infection.

Infected larvae demonstrated increasing concentrations of gliotoxin and siderophore and displayed reduced amounts of haemolymph carbohydrate and protein. Fungal proteins (399) were detected by qualitative proteomic analysis in cell-free haemolymph at 96 hours and could be categorized into seven groups, including virulence ( = 25), stress response ( = 34), DNA repair and replication ( = 39), translation ( = 22), metabolism ( = 42), released intracellular ( = 28) and cellular development and cell cycle ( = 53). Analysis of the Gallerial proteome at 96 hours post-infection revealed changes in the abundance of proteins associated with immune function, metabolism, cellular structure, insect development, transcription/translation and detoxification.

Characterizing the impact of the fungal secretome on the host may provide an insight into how damages tissue and suppresses the immune response during long-term pulmonary colonization.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2024-06-05
2024-06-17
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