1887

Abstract

The 16S rRNA methyltransferase (16S RMTase) gene is the most common mechanism conferring high-level aminoglycoside resistance in , although , , , and have also been reported.

The occurrence of 16S RMTase genes in in the UK and Republic of Ireland is currently unknown.

To identify the occurrence of 16S RMTase genes in isolates from the UK and the Republic of Ireland between 2004 and 2015.

Five hundred and fifty pan-aminoglycoside-resistant isolates isolated from the UK and the Republic of Ireland between 2004 and 2015 were screened by PCR to detect known 16S RMTase genes, and then whole-genome sequencing was conducted to screen for novel 16S RMTase genes.

A total of 96.5 % (531/550) of isolates were positive for 16S RMTase genes, with all but 1 harbouring (99.8 %, 530/531). The remaining isolates harboured , a new variant. Most (89.2 %, 473/530) -positive isolates belonged to international clone II (ST2), and the -positive isolate belonged to ST79. shared a similar genetic environment to but lacked an IS element found upstream of .

This is the first report of in in Europe; the potential for transmission of to other bacterial species requires further research.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Institute for Health Research (Award HPRU-2012-10047)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-05-19
2022-07-06
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