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Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) comprises a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a high prevalence in childhood. The gut microbiota can affect human cognition and moods and has a strong correlation with ASD. Microbiota transplantation, including faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), probiotics, breastfeeding, formula feeding, gluten-free and casein-free (GFCF) diet and ketogenic diet therapy, may provide satisfying effects for ASD and its related various symptoms. For instance, FMT can improve the core symptoms of ASD and gastrointestinal symptoms. Probiotics, breastfeeding and formula feeding, and GFCF diet can improve gastrointestinal symptoms. The core symptom score still needs to be confirmed by large-scale clinical randomized controlled studies. It is recommended to use a ketogenic diet to treat patients with epilepsy in ASD. At present, the unresolved problems include which of gut the microbiota are beneficial, which of the microorganisms are harmful, how to safely and effectively implant beneficial bacteria into the human body, and how to extract and eliminate harmful microorganisms before transplantation. In future studies, large sample and randomized controlled clinical studies are needed to confirm the mechanism of intestinal microorganisms in the treatment of ASD and the method of microbial transplantation.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001469
2021-12-13
2022-01-27
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