1887

Abstract

The nasopharyngeal microbiome is a dynamic microbial interface of the aerodigestive tract, and a diagnostic window in the fight against respiratory infections and antimicrobial resistance. As its constituent bacteria, viruses and mycobacteria become better understood and sampling accuracy improves, diagnostics of the nasopharynx could guide more personalized care of infections of surrounding areas including the lungs, ears and sinuses. This review will summarize the current literature from a clinical perspective and highlight its growing importance in diagnostics and infectious disease management.

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2021-06-24
2021-07-29
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