1887

Abstract

causes intestinal parasitic infections affecting both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals.

Given the absence of effective treatments for cryptosporidiosis, especially in immunodeficient patients, the present study was designed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of secnidazole (SEC) and its combination with nitazoxanide (NTZ) in comparison to single NTZ treatment in relation to the immune status of a murine model of infection.

The infected groups were administered NTZ, SEC or NTZ–SEC for three or five successive doses. At days 10 and 12 post-infection (p.i.), the mice were sacrificed, and the efficacy of the applied drugs was evaluated by comparing the histopathological alterations in ileum and measuring the T helper Th1 (interferon gamma; IFN-γ), Th2 [interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10] and Th17 (IL-17) cytokine profiles in serum.

The NTZ–SEC combination recorded the maximal reduction of oocyst shedding, endogenous stages count and intestinal histopathology, regardless of the immune status of the infected mice. The efficacy of NTZ–SEC was dependent on the period of administration, as the 5 day-based treatment protocol was also more effective than the 3 day-based one in terms of immunocompetence and immunosuppression. The present treatment schedule induced an immunomodulatory effect from SEC that developed a protective immune response against infection with reduced production of serum IL-17, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10.

Application of NTZ–SEC combined therapy may be useful in treatment of , especially in cases involving immunosuppression.

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2021-02-24
2021-10-28
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