1887

Abstract

has emerged as one of the most common multi-drug-resistant pathogens isolated from people with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, its adaptation over time to CF lungs has not been fully established.

Sequential isolates of from a Brazilian adult patient are clonally related and show a pattern of adaptation by loss of virulence factors.

To investigate antimicrobial susceptibility, clonal relatedness, mutation frequency, quorum sensing (QS) and selected virulence factors in sequential isolates from a Brazilian adult patient attending a CF referral centre in Buenos Aires, Argentina, between May 2014 and May 2018.

The antibiotic resistance of 11 S. isolates recovered from expectorations of an adult female with CF was determined. Clonal relatedness, mutation frequency, QS variants (RpfC–RpfF), QS autoinducer (DSF) and virulence factors were investigated in eight viable isolates.

Seven isolates were resistant to trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole and five to levofloxacin. All isolates were susceptible to minocycline. Strong, weak and normomutators were detected, with a tendency to decreased mutation rate over time. PFGE revealed that seven isolates belong to two related clones. All isolates were RpfC–RpfF1 variants and DSF producers. Only two isolates produced weak biofilms, but none displayed swimming or twitching motility. Four isolates showed proteolytic activity and amplified and genes. Only the first three isolates were siderophore producers. Four isolates showed high resistance to oxidative stress, while the last four showed moderate resistance.

The present study shows the long-time persistence of two related clones in an adult female with CF. During the adaptation of the prevalent clones to the CF lungs over time, we identified a gradual loss of virulence factors that could be associated with the high amounts of DSF produced by the evolved isolates. Further, a decreased mutation rate was observed in the late isolates. The role of all these adaptations over time remains to be elucidated from a clinical perspective, probably focusing on the damage they can cause to CF lungs.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Secretaria de Ciencia y Tecnica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100007351 (Award UBACYT 20020170100473BA)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Not Applicable
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2020-12-01
2021-10-27
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