1887

Abstract

harbouring , a specific chromosomal marker of is found in patients with severe manifestations and causes nosocomial outbreaks.

We assessed the genetic characteristics and virulence of (+) in a hospital setting.

Three neutropenic patients with haematological malignancy developed bacteraemia within a short period. Fifteen were isolated from different sites in a haematology ward. A total of 18 isolates were evaluated for - and -related virulence, food poisoning-related virulence, genetic diversity, bacteria motility and biofilm formation.

(+) was detected in 33 % (1/3) of patients and 66 % (9/15) of the hospital environment. The 18 strains were divided into 2 major clusters (clade 1 and clade 2), and 14 strains were classified into clade 1. All (+) strains, including four sequence types, were classified into clade 1/the cereus III lineage, which is most closely related to the anthracis lineage. Two strains belonging to clade 1/non-cereus III carried the -associated gene, but not , including (+) strains, had significantly lower prevalence of enterotoxin genes than clade 2 strains. In clade 1, , (+) strains showed significantly higher swimming motility and biofilm formation ability than (−) strains.

(+) , which are genetically closely related to , were abundant in a haematological ward. (+) with high motility and biofilm formation abilities may spread easily in hospital environments, and could become a hospital-acquired infection.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Tetsuji Aoyagi , Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research , (Award 18K08424)
  • Tetsuji Aoyagi , Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research , (Award 25860825)
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2020-06-12
2020-08-11
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