1887

Abstract

During chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, HCV antigens establish cross-tolerance of endotoxins, but additional lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation effects in this condition are poorly understood.

This study aims to investigate the effects of the upregulated LPS on MMP and TIMP expression during chronic hepatitis C infection.

In the present study, we analysed the effect of HCV antigens and LPS stimulation on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) both and . Macrophages from HCV patients were isolated and their association with endotoxin tolerance was examined. MMP/TIMP1 expression and the related signalling pathways in macrophages were analysed. The macrophage and Huh7.5 cell co-culture model was used to analyse the effects of the cross-tolerance on collagen I deposition.

LPS levels were found to be significantly higher in HCV patients, particularly in those with HCV-induced liver fibrosis. In addition, although LPS serum level was occasionally upregulated in the patients, it did not induce intense immune response in PBMCs due to endotoxin cross-tolerance, and this was measured according to the changes in IL-6 and TNF-α levels. However, TIMP1 expression increased significantly during stimulation, exhibiting a tolerance/resistance phenotype, which was associated with TGF-β/Erk activation in macrophages. However, MMP levels did not increase due to endotoxin tolerance, which ultimately led to MMP/TIMP imbalance and influenced the deposition of collagen I.

Increased LPS stimulation of macrophage during HCV antigen-induced endotoxin cross-tolerance contributes to MMP/TIMP1 imbalance and collagen I deposition.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • FAN CHAO , National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) , (Award 81670529)
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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001185
2020-04-03
2020-06-04
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