1887

Abstract

. is a foodborne pathogen that causes central nervous system (CNS) and maternal-neonatal (MN) infections, bacteremia (BAC), and gastroenteritis in humans and ruminants. Specific clonal complexes (CC) have been associated with severe listeriosis cases, however, less is known about differences among subgroup virulence patterns. This study aimed to assess variation in virulence across different CC and clinical outcomes.

. larvae were used to compare virulence phenotypes of 34 . strains representing isolates from CC1, CC6 (from lineage I), and CC7, CC9, CC14, CC37 and CC204 (from lineage II) classified by clinical outcome: BAC, CNS and MN infection. Larvae survival, LD, cytotoxicity, health index scores and bacterial concentrations post-infection were evaluated as quantifiable indicators of virulence.

. Isolates belonging to CC14 and MN-associated infections are hypervirulent in as they led to lower survival rates and health index scores, as well as reduced cytotoxic effects when compared to other CC and clinical outcomes included here. CC14 isolates also showed increased bacterial concentrations at 8 and 24 h post-infection, indicating ability to survive the initial immune response and proliferate within larvae.

. Subgroups of possess different virulence phenotypes that may be associated with niche-specificity. While hypervirulent clones have been identified so far in lineage I, our data demonstrate that hypervirulent clones are not restricted to lineage I, as CC14 belongs to lineage II. Identification of subgroups with a higher ability to cause disease may facilitate surveillance and management of listeriosis.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001076
2019-09-16
2019-10-20
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