1887

Abstract

is the most common cause of bacterial pharyngitis. Genotyping of is useful for molecular epidemiological survey of . Antibiotic resistance data are needed for empirical treatments.

In total, 358 children in Changwon, Korea who had pharyngitis symptoms were subjected to throat cultures to isolate in 2017. genotyping was performed by direct sequencing. An antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using the disk diffusion method for erythromycin (ERY), clindamycin (CLI), tetracycline (TET) and ofloxacin (OFX). Screening for macrolide resistance phenotype and its determinants was performed for the ERY-resistant strains.

A total of 190 strains (53.1 %) of were isolated from 358 children. The most frequent genotype was 4 (53.2 %), followed by 89 (12.6 %), 28 (11.6 %) and 1 (10 %). Antibiotic resistance rates to ERY, CLI, TET and OFX were 3.2 %, 2.6 %, 1.1 % and 2.6%, respectively. There were five isolates of the cMLS phenotype having the gene and one M phenotype harbouring the gene.

The distribution of genotypes was quite different from those previously reported in Korea. 4 accounted for more than 50  % of the genotypes. Macrolide resistance rates remained very low, but five of six ERY-resistant strains displayed the cMLS phenotype.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001005
2019-07-01
2019-10-21
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