1887

Abstract

Purpose. To prevent severe invasive pneumococcal infection, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) were introduced in Japan in 2010, and in 2013 a pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was included in the routine vaccination schedule for infants. In this study, we analysed the antimicrobial susceptibilities and capsular types of pneumococci isolated from non-invasive patient sites from 2007 to 2016 to assess the impact of the introduction of PCV13.

Methodology. A total of 618 pneumococcal isolates collected at a teaching hospital from 2007 to 2016 were used. These isolates were characterized by capsular typing, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

Results. Capsular typing indicated that, after the introduction of the PCV, the proportion of PCV13 serotypes decreased (P<0.01), while non-PCV13 serotypes became diverse. In particular, increases in 22 F, 15A and 23A were noted among non-PCV13 serotypes. Regarding antimicrobial susceptibility, the non-susceptibility rate to penicillin of pneumococci that showed higher minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) than the susceptibility breakpoint decreased, and pneumococci tended to become susceptible. However, all type 23A pneumococci and 77.8  % of type 15A pneumococci showed the reverse trend, with low susceptibility to penicillin. Furthermore, all 15A and 23A isolates had macrolide resistance genes.

Conclusion. These data suggest that PCVs can prevent infections caused by PCV serotypes. However, since non-PCV13-type pneumococci, in particular 15A and 23A, which have acquired multidrug resistance, have already emerged over time, the development of a novel vaccine targeting a broader spectrum of pneumococci is warranted.

Keyword(s): capsular type , non-vaccine type and PCV
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2019-05-15
2022-01-28
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