1887

Abstract

Clinical epidemiological data about the distinct species remain scarce. The recurrence of -related skin diseases, despite long-term use of antifungals, raises concern about the hypothetical emergence of antifungal resistance. We aimed to assess the distribution of species among patients from a University Hospital with pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis and healthy volunteers, and to evaluate the susceptibility profile to classic antifungals and over-the-counter compounds, searching for clinical associations.

The enrollment of volunteers was conducted at the Dermatology Department of a University Hospital over a 3 year period. culture isolates were identified to the species-level by sequencing. The drug susceptibility profile was assessed according to a broth microdilution assay, as recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute.

A total of 86 isolates were recovered from 182 volunteers. was the most frequent isolated species. We found high MIC values and a wide MIC range in the case of tested azoles, and very low terbinafine MIC values against most isolates. Previous topical corticosteroid therapy was associated with a significant increase of MIC values of fluconazole and of terbinafine.

Conversely to other European studies, was the most common isolated species, which might be related to geographic reasons. The impact of previous topical corticotherapy upon the antifungal susceptibility profile was hereby demonstrated. susceptibility test results suggest that terbinafine might be a valid alternative for -related skin diseases nonresponsive to azoles.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.000966
2019-05-01
2020-01-26
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