1887

Abstract

Epidemiological and microbiological data on (=699) and (=35) isolated from human clinical specimens in England between April 2004 and March 2018 were reviewed. Traditional biochemical species identification and serological typing results were compared with species identifications and serotypes derived from whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data for a sub-set of these isolates (=179).

Most isolates were from faecal specimens (74.4%) from adults (80.7%) and 50.7  % of isolates were from male patients. Most isolates were from blood cultures (68.6%) from adults (91%) and 60.0  % of isolates were from male patients. All sequenced isolates of (=158) and (=21), as well as isolates belonging to other species (=21), were correctly identified from genomic data using a kmer-based identification approach. Traditional phenotypic serotyping typed 82/158 and 12/21 isolates of and , respectively, while 118/158 and 21/21 isolates of and respectively, were typed by the genome-derived serotyping method. In addition, WGS data provided a multi-locus sequence type profile and virulence gene profile for all isolates.

The use of WGS for typing and at Public Health England will facilitate the monitoring of animal-to-human transmission of these important foodborne pathogens in the UK and improve public health surveillance of the pathogenic lineages.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.000943
2019-04-01
2019-10-17
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