1887

Abstract

Purpose. Potent extracellular toxins including alpha-haemolysin, Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) significantly contribute to Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis, thus, toxin suppression is a primary focus in treatment of staphylococcal disease. S. aureus maintains complex strategies to regulate toxin expression and previous data have demonstrated that subinhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics can adversely increase S. aureus exotoxin production. The current study evaluates the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of tedizolid, a second-generation oxazolidinone derivative, on expression of staphylococcal exotoxins in both methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus .

Methodology. S. aureus exotoxin expression levels were compared at 12 and 24 h following treatment with tedizolid, linezolid, nafcillin or vehicle control.

Results. Our findings show that the level of antibiotic required to alter toxin production was strain-dependent and corresponds with the quantity of toxin produced, but both tedizolid and linezolid could effectively reduce expression of alpha-haemolysin, PVL and TSST-1 toxin at subinhibitory concentrations. In contrast, nafcillin showed less attenuation and, in some S. aureus strains, led to an increase in toxin expression. Tedizolid consistently inhibited toxin production at a lower overall drug concentration than comparator agents.

Conclusion. Together, our data support that tedizolid has the potential to improve outcomes of infection due to its superior ability to inhibit S. aureus growth and attenuate exotoxin production.

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2018-12-17
2020-01-25
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