1887

Abstract

With this study, we introduce a liquid flush for catheters and other tubing-based applications that consists of a solution of β-phenylethylamine (PEA) in tryptic soy broth. The initial experiments in multiwell polystyrene plates were conducted with Escherichia coli K-12 to assess the effectiveness of PEA at reducing planktonic growth, as well as the biomass and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of biofilm; PEA reduced these growth parameters as a function of increasing concentration. This effect was also seen in mutants of PEA catabolism, which leads us to believe that the PEA effect is due to PEA itself and not one of its degradation products. Since PEA reduced planktonic growth and biofilm when added at the time of inoculation, as well as at later time points, we propose PEA as a novel compound for the prevention and treatment of biofilm. PEA reduced planktonic growth and the ATP content of the biofilm for five bacterial pathogens, including an enterohemorrhagic E. coli, two uropathogenic E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. A major finding of this study is the reduction of the ATP content of biofilm that formed in silicone tubing by periodic flushes of PEA. This experiment was performed to model antibiotic-lock treatment of an intravenous catheter. It was found that 10 mg ml of PEA reduced the ATP content of biofilm of five bacterial strains by 96.3 % or more after 2 weeks of incubation and three treatments with PEA. For P. aeruginosa, the reduction in ATP content was paralleled by an identical percentage reduction in viable cells in the biofilm.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.000840
2018-10-16
2019-09-15
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