1887

Abstract

About 10 % of gastric carcinoma worldwide is associated with EBV, which is defined as EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). To date, EBV sequence data from EBVaGC in Guangdong, China, an endemic area of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), are not available. In the present study, two EBV genomes from EBVaGC specimens from Guangdong (designated as GDGC1 and GDGC2) were determined by next-generation sequencing, de novo assembly and joining of contigs by Sanger sequencing. In addition, we sequenced EBV from two Korean EBVaGC cell lines, YCCEL1 and SNU-719. Genomic diversity, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions and deletions (indels), phylogenetic analysis and rates of protein evolution, was performed using bioinformatics software. The four gastric carcinoma-derived EBV (GC-EBV) were all type I. Compared with the reference EBV genome, a total of 1815 SNPs (146 indels), 1519 SNPs (106 indels), 1812 SNPs (126 indels) and 1484 SNPs (106 indels) were found in GDGC1, GDGC2, YCCEL1 and SNU-719, respectively. These variations were distributed across the entire genome, especially in latent genes. In contrast, the sequences of promoters and non-coding RNAs were strictly conserved. Phylogenetic analyses suggested the presence of at least two parental lineages of EBV among the GC-EBV genomes. Rates of protein evolution analyses showed that lytic genes were under purifying selection; in contrast, latency genes were under positive selection. In conclusion, this study determined the EBV genomes in EBVaGC from Guangdong and performed a detailed genome-wide analysis of GC-EBV, which would be helpful for further understanding of the relationship between EBV genomic variation and EBVaGC carcinogenesis.

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2018-09-21
2019-10-23
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