1887

Abstract

Our aim was to prospectively manage 22 -exposed individuals and identify the lapses in laboratory practices that lead to the exposure. The exposed individuals were risk-stratified, assessed for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), counselled to self-monitor symptoms and followed-up with three serology tests. Staff laboratory practices were recorded. Ten out of 13 high-risk individuals received PEP within 48 h of exposure. Compliance with PEP and serology monitoring was 90 and 96 %, respectively. No brucellosis cases were documented. A single handler manipulated the isolate on the open bench. Movement of the isolate was tracked in detail, highlighting various points of laboratory non-conformance. Early PEP intervention is effective in preventing acquired brucellosis. Our pragmatic post-exposure management achieved high PEP and serology compliance. We experience first-hand how regular staff engagement motivated PEP adherence and interval blood sampling attendance. The enforcement of practical strategies and safety practices was also implemented without compromising our laboratory processing times.

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2018-07-01
2020-01-26
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