1887

Abstract

Purpose. The aim of this study was to characterize serogroup 19 isolates resistant to macrolides and/or penicillin found among pneumococci recovered from cases of invasive and respiratory tract disease in the Czech Republic in 2014.

Methods. Pneumococcal isolates of serotypes 19A (n=26) and 19F (n=10) that were non-susceptible to penicillin and/or macrolides and had been collected in 2014 were analysed using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Four isolates representing the major clones were subjected to whole-genome sequencing (WGS).

Results. The penicillin-susceptible macrolide-resistant isolates of serotype 19A were mainly associated with sequence type (ST) 416 belonging to clonal complex (CC) 199, and the penicillin-resistant isolates were of serotype 19F belonging to ST1464 (CC 320). WGS revealed the presence of pilus 1, in association with pilus 2, in serotype19F isolates belonging to CC 320. Another adhesin, pneumococcal serine-rich protein (PsrP), was only present in serotype 19A isolates of ST416. Analysis of the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of serotype 19F penicillin-resistant isolates (ST1464 and ST271) performed on PBP1a, 2b and 2x identified a large number of mutations in comparison to the reference strain, R6. Both isolates contained a unique PBP profile; however, they were highly similar to PBP sequences of the Taiwan-14 reference strain. The Pbp2b sequences of both 19F isolates showed the lowest similarity to those of the Taiwan-14 strain (91 % similarity), while they were also found to be distantly related to each other (94 % similarity).

Conclusions. WGS revealed specific virulence factors in antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal clones that spread rapidly in the post-vaccine era in the Czech Republic.

Keyword(s): MLST , Streptoccoccus pneumoniae and WGS
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2018-06-01
2019-10-24
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