1887

Abstract

Purpose. The lack of novel antifungal drugs and the increasing incidence and severity of fungal infections are major concerns worldwide. Herein, we tested the activity of the Blad-containing oligomer (BCO), a new antifungal molecule already in use for agriculture, on Malassezia spp. and dermatophytes, the causal agents of human tinea versicolor and tinea pedis. Given the lack of a standard method for Malassezia susceptibility testing and the plethora of published methods, we also developed an improved method for this genus.

Methodology. The efficacy of BCO was assessed in vitro and compared to that of the drugs currently utilized in the treatment of tinea versicolor (fluconazole and itraconazole) and tinea pedis (itraconazole and terbinafine). For dermatophytes, the standard microdilution broth-based method was used, with small adjustments, and several broth formulations and inocula sizes were tested to develop an improved susceptibility method for Malassezia spp.

Results. We successfully developed a microdilution broth-based method with considerable advantages over other available methods, and used it for all in vitro susceptibility tests of Malassezia spp. isolates. We report that, on a molar basis, BCO was more effective than fluconazole or itraconazole on most strains of Malassezia spp. isolated from clinical samples (n=29). By contrast, BCO was less effective than itraconazole or terbinafine on the common dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale.

Conclusion. These data place BCO as a promising drug for the treatment of Malassezia-associated skin diseases. Further in vivo studies are now required to ascertain its applicability in the clinical setting.

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2018-01-09
2019-10-19
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