1887

Abstract

This study explored the prevalence and characteristics of biofilm formation by urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates in order to identify virulence factors associated with biofilm formation.

A total of 113 isolates were collected from UTI patients in Shenzhen, China. The isolates were subjected to multilocus sequence typing based on housekeeping genes. Biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and the expression levels of the genes were detected by quantitative real-time PCR.

The main sequence types (STs) were ST16 and ST179 with the ST16 isolates more likely to form strong biofilms than the ST179 isolates (). Strong biofilm formation was more frequently detected in aggregation substance ()-positive (+) isolates than in negative (−) isolates (). Biofilm formation was also more common in isolates containing enterococcal surface protein (), or cytolysin A ()-positive (+) isolates than in isolates negative (−) for these virulence factors. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that [odds ratio (OR), 7.143, =] was associated with weak biofilm formation, and that (OR, 4.471, ) was associated with strong biofilm formation. The expression of was increased (8.75- to 23.05-fold) in weak biofilm, and the expression of was greatly elevated (11.99- to 439.10-fold) in strong biofilm isolates when compared to biofilm-negative isolates.

ST16 classification was positively associated with strong biofilm formation in as was , while was associated with weak biofilm formation.

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2018-01-01
2020-01-22
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