1887

Abstract

Fungaemia is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). We report an outbreak of fungaemia in a NICU due to rare yeast, (a teleomorph of ). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of neonatal sepsis due to .

Between August and September 2014, blood cultures from nine neonates diagnosed with late-onset sepsis in the NICU yielded yeast-like organisms. The molecular identification and typing of these isolates was performed by sequencing the D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) respectively. Antifungal susceptibility was tested by broth microdilution as per the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Sampling from environmental sources and the hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) in the NICU was performed.

Of the nine neonates, eight were preterm and six had very low birth weight (VLBW). Thrombocytopenia was present in two neonates. Sequencing identified all the isolates as and FAFLP showed their clonal origin. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed the susceptibility of all isolates to the antifungals tested. Treatment with voriconazole was advised. However, only seven neonates were treated successfully and discharged after improvement, whereas two were lost for follow-up. Cultures from the environment and the hands of HCWs were negative. The outbreak was controlled by the strict implementation of infection control practices.

This study emphasizes the importance of accurate identification of the aetiological agent of sepsis and vigilant monitoring for the possibility of an outbreak in NICUs.

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2017-12-01
2020-01-23
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