1887

Abstract

The nasal cavity harbours a commensal microbiota that reportedly provides colonization resistance against respiratory pathogens. Following the onset of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), a change in sinus microbiota composition is frequently reported in which atypical anaerobic and/or Gram-negative bacteria predominate. We have investigated pairwise interactions between respiratory bacteria isolated from healthy adults (=3) and individuals exhibiting CRS (=3). Antagonism was determined using a spot plate methodology and coaggregation scores were determined using a quantitative spectrophotometric assay. Obligate anaerobes were isolated from all CRS samples and exhibited inter-host growth inhibition of commensal nasal bacteria, including spp. and spp. Antagonism between bacteria isolated from healthy individuals was limited to corynebacterial-mediated inhibition of the staphylococci. The frequency of coaggregation was low overall (2/153 pairwise interactions). Antagonism of the nasal microbiota by respiratory pathogens may represent a competitive strategy in the sinus and warrants further investigation.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.000567
2017-09-01
2020-01-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/66/9/1338.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.000567&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Smith K, Mccoy KD, Macpherson AJ. Use of axenic animals in studying the adaptation of mammals to their commensal intestinal Microbiota. Semin Immunol 2007;19:59–69 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bomar L, Brugger SD, Yost BH, Davies SS, Lemon KP. Corynebacterium accolens releases antipneumococcal free fatty acids from human nostril and skin surface triacylglycerols. mBio 2016;7:e01725-1501715 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Zipperer A, Konnerth MC, Laux C, Berscheid A, Janek D et al. Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization. Nature 2016;535:511–516 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Brook I. Microbiology of chronic rhinosinusitis. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;35:1059–1068 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Niederfuhr A, Kirsche H, Riechelmann H, Wellinghausen N. The bacteriology of chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2009;135:131–136 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Thanasumpun T, Batra PS. Endoscopically-derived bacterial cultures in chronic rhinosinusitis: a systematic review. Am J Otolaryngol 2015;36:686–691 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Arild Danielsen K, Eskeland Ø, Fridrich-Aas K, Cecilie Orszagh V, Bachmann-Harildstad G et al. Bacterial biofilms in chronic rhinosinusitis; distribution and prevalence. Acta Otolaryngol 2016;136:109–112 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Bradshaw DJ, Marsh PD, Watson GK, Allison C. Oral anaerobes cannot survive oxygen stress without interacting with facuItative/aerobic species as a microbial commmunity. Lett Appl Microbiol 1997;25:385–387 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Bradshaw DJ, Marsh PD, Allison C, Schilling KM. Effect of oxygen, inoculum composition and flow rate on development of mixed-culture oral biofilms. Microbiology 1996;142:623–629 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Bradshaw DJ, Marsh PD, Watson GK, Allison C. Role of Fusobacterium nucleatum and coaggregation in anaerobe survival in planktonic and biofilm oral microbial communities during aeration. Infect Immun 1998;66:4729–4732[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Rickard AH, Gilbert P, High NJ, Kolenbrander PE, Handley PS. Bacterial coaggregation: an integral process in the development of multi-species biofilms. Trends Microbiol 2003;11:94–100 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Iwase T, Uehara Y, Shinji H, Tajima A, Seo H et al. Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and nasal colonization. Nature 2010;465:346–349 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Humphreys GJ, Mcbain AJ. Continuous culture of sessile human oropharyngeal microbiotas. J Med Microbiol 2013;62:906–916 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Versalovic J, Schneider MA, de Bruijn FJ, Lupski JR. Genomic fingerprinting of bacteria using repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction. Methods Mol Cell Biol 1994;5:25–40
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Gevers D, Huys G, Swings J. Applicability of rep-PCR fingerprinting for identification of Lactobacillus species. FEMS Microbiol Lett 2001;205:31–36 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Bassis CM, Tang AL, Young VB, Pynnonen MA. The nasal cavity microbiota of healthy adults. Microbiome 2014;2:27 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Brook I. Bacteriology of acute and chronic sphenoid sinusitis. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2002;111:1002–1004 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Paju S, Bernstein JM, Haase EM, Scannapieco FA. Molecular analysis of bacterial flora associated with chronically inflamed maxillary sinuses. J Med Microbiol 2003;52:591–597 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Stressmann FA, Rogers GB, Chan SW, Howarth PH, Harries PG et al. Characterization of bacterial community diversity in chronic rhinosinusitis infections using novel culture-independent techniques. Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011;25:133–140 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Jack RW, Wan J, Gordon J, Harmark K, Davidson BE et al. Characterization of the chemical and antimicrobial properties of piscicolin 126, a bacteriocin produced by Carnobacterium piscicola JG126. Appl Environ Microbiol 1996;62:2897–2903[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Lemon KP, Klepac-Ceraj V, Schiffer HK, Brodie EL, Lynch SV et al. Comparative analyses of the bacterial microbiota of the human nostril and oropharynx. MBio 2010;1:e0012900110 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Uehara Y, Nakama H, Agematsu K, Uchida M, Kawakami Y et al. Bacterial interference among nasal inhabitants: eradication of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal cavities by artificial implantation of Corynebacterium sp. J Hosp Infect 2000;44:127–133 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Ledder RG, Timperley AS, Friswell MK, Macfarlane S, Mcbain AJ. Coaggregation between and among human intestinal and oral bacteria. FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2008;66:630–636 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Pérez-Ortega J, Rodríguez A, Ribes E, Tommassen J, Arenas J. Interstrain cooperation in meningococcal biofilms: role of autotransporters NalP and AutA. Front Microbiol 2017;8:434 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Tompkins GR, Peavey MA, Birchmeier KR, Tagg JR. Bacteriocin production and sensitivity among coaggregating and noncoaggregating oral streptococci. Oral Microbiol Immunol 1997;12:98–105 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Matsune S, Kono M, Sun D, Ushikai M, Kurono Y. Hypoxia in paranasal sinuses of patients with chronic sinusitis with or without the complication of nasal allergy. Acta Otolaryngol 2003;123:519–523 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Steinke JW, Woodard CR, Borish L. Role of hypoxia in inflammatory upper airway disease. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2008;8:16–20 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.000567
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.000567
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error