1887

Abstract

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is capable of surviving in a wide variety of environments and is considered to be among the antimicrobial-resistant bacteria of greatest public health concern in hospital settings. To clarify the role of houseflies (Musca domestica) in disseminating this bacterium, we collected 99 individuals from 15 locations (9 farms and 6 urban areas) in Thailand. S. maltophilia was isolated from 39 % (39/99) of these houseflies, with the isolation rates being similar in farms and urban areas. Multiple-antimicrobial resistance was evident among the S. maltophilia isolates obtained. Of note, the rate of resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), the recommended first-line antimicrobial for S. maltophilia infection, was relatively high (30 %). Almost all of the isolates had a different PFGE pattern. These results suggest that houseflies ingest and host S. maltophilia from several different environmental sources. In conclusion, houseflies may facilitate the spread of antimicrobial-resistant (including TMP/SMX-resistant) S. maltophilia from environmental sources to humans.

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2017-08-04
2019-10-21
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