1887

Abstract

Surgical site infection (SSI) remains one of the most important causes of healthcare-associated infections, accounting for ~17 % of all hospital-acquired infections. Although short-term perioperative treatment with high fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO) has shown clinical benefits in reducing SSI in colorectal resection surgeries, the true clinical benefits of FiO therapy in reducing SSI remain unclear because randomized controlled trials on this topic have yielded disparate results and inconsistent conclusions. To date, no animal study has been conducted to determine the efficacy of short-term perioperative treatments with high (FiO>60 %) versus low (FiO<40 %) oxygen in reducing SSI. In this report, we designed a rat model for muscle surgery to compare the effectiveness of short-term perioperative treatments with high (FiO=80 %) versus a standard low (FiO=30 %) oxygen in reducing SSI with – one of the most prevalent Gram-negative pathogens, responsible for nosocomial SSIs. Our data demonstrate that 5 h perioperative treatment with 80 % FiO is significantly more effective in reducing SSI with compared to 30 % FiO treatment. We further show that whilst 80 % FiO treatment does not affect neutrophil infiltration into infected muscles, neutrophils in the 80 % FiO-treated and infected animal group are significantly more activated than neutrophils in the 30 % FiO-treated and infected animal group, suggesting that high oxygen perioperative treatment reduces SSI with by enhancing neutrophil activation in infected wounds.

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2016-08-01
2021-10-22
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