1887

Abstract

The report of four novel mammalian pathogenic species of the genus prompted us to study the use of biochemical assays to differentiate the Oomycota mammalian pathogens and spp. We investigated the reaction of 23 and eight species in various biochemical assays. Because the morphological features of the Oomycota species are similar to those of species in the Entomophthoramycota and Mucormycota, five fungal species with coenocytic hyphae were also included. We found that mammalian and plant isolates of spp. all hydrolysed sucrose, but species and the fungal strains did not. In addition, both spp. and spp. were found to be maltose-positive, whereas fungal strains did not hydrolyse this sugar. The fungal species and thermo-sensitive and were urease-negative, but the mammalian spp. and spp. hydrolysed urea within 24 h. These findings suggest these assays can be used for the presumptive differentiation of mammalian Oomycota species in the laboratory.

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2015-08-01
2022-01-25
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