1887

Abstract

is a Gram-negative bacteria associated with hospital-acquired infections. Definitely, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation capabilities of clinical isolates have threading potential to persistence in the hospital environment and colonization on medical equipment. Twenty-seven multidrug-resistant clinical isolates were selected from a collection of samples isolated from clinical settings. PCR assays showed the frequencies of genes related to biofilm formation: (100 %), (30 %) and PER-1 (44 %). Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant AbOmpA8–346 and Bap1–487 proteins were obtained by the mouse immunization method. Western blotting revealed all isolates expressed AbOmpA and only eight isolates were positive for Bap factor. Two strains that had their gene disrupted with IS did not express Bap protein. Our findings showed that all double-negative /PER-1 isolates were recovered from the bloodstream and had low biofim formation capabilities, and mostly belonged to type D wrinkled colony morphology. However, clinical isolates extracted from the throats of patients were PER-1-positive and had a great capacity to form biofilm, and also mostly belonged to type C wrinkled colony morphology.

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2015-05-01
2020-01-21
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