1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Non-sporing strictly anaerobic bacteria were isolated from human faecal samples from England, Scotland, USA, India, Uganda and Japan. Strains were assigned to genera on the basis of the Gram reaction and on the type of fatty acid produced from glucose. Analysis of these acids was by gas-liquid chromatography. The isolates were further classified on the basis of various biochemical reactions.

was the non-sporing anaerobe most frequently isolated from human faeces. and were also frequently isolated. Stool samples from India, Uganda and Japan contained a larger proportion of eubacteria and fewer spp. than did the samples from England, Scotland and the USA.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-7-2-213
1974-05-01
2022-05-21
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